Monday, 30 April 2012


Watermark was a 90 minute intervention on Barbosa Park, Istanbul on 29 March 2012.  Claire painted water onto a course of adjacent paving stones, drawing a line that follows a prominent route taken across that space by pedestrians. The water dries and the line documenting the movement of the people fades and disappears, echoing the temporal nature of people's presence in that place.

Friday, 27 April 2012


Spread is the third in a series of animated drawings onto mountcard.  They take inspiration from Richard Serra's verb works, where he created sculptures in response to words such as 'to roll', 'to crumple' or 'to cut'. 

I'm going to take some of the words from his list, but also include words that have an inherent feeling of movement in them too, then create a series of drawings using cut away mountcard.  So far I've made 'descend', 'curve' and 'spread'.  More to follow over the process of time.  Longlist of future words includes:

scatter, pair, surround, lift, follow, fall, shuffle, jump, loop, grow, criss-cross, ramble,

Monday, 16 April 2012

Large artworks - free to a good home

****These artworks have now been taken to a good home by their new owner****

Claire Weetman is moving studios during April and has two large artworks that she can no longer store. These are available for free, collected from St Helens. If you are interested in owning either of the works below, please email before the end of April to save them from the skip. These are also listed on Ebay where 50% of any selling price will be donated to Charity.

Untitled: Four Panels. 2008
Paint marker on perspex.
Four sheets of 12mm Perspex, H2.44m x W1.22m

Untitled, Four Panels was created in 2008 during the Liverpool International Artists exhibition at Novas CUC. It comprises four perspex panels, with drawings on one surface of each. The drawings, in black or white, mapped and followed the movement and silhouettes of visitors to this exhibition.

The original installation was four panels displayed in the centre of a room in parallel, however, for preservation of the drawings, they would be best displayed fixed to a wall, with the drawn surface behind the perspex.

These would be ideal for a public space, or as a feature wall in a large home. You can take all four panels or fewer if appropriate.

Stepped 2008

Two rows of perspex panels, standing vertical from a white formica-clad base box.
Base is 2.4m long, 0.75m deep, 0.20m high. Panels stand perpendicular to the base to a height of approx 0.75m
Stepped features drawings of legs and feet, captured from a street in Stuttgart in 2008. They are line drawings onto 14 pieces of perspex, which overlap each other in two rows, creating a 3-dimensional representation of the people passing along the street.

The drawn surface is protected in a sandwich of two pieces of perspex, which then slot into the base box and are bolted together using discreet chrome fixings at the top. The base box has a slight chip to it's formica cladding where a cleaning machine damaged it on first installation. The perspex panels do not have rounded corners, so may prove a risk if displayed in an accessible public space. Stepped was created as a commission, but was unable to be installed following risk assessment that the corners of the perspex were an injury hazard for display in a public space.